Pigs, Bumpkins and Mark Leibovich

Can you think of anything that is less likely to change political behavior then being called a bumpkin by Mark Leibovich? Here is a link to his story “If Pigs Could Vote” in today’s New York Times magazine.

He is critical of Republican, Joni Ernst, for incorporating pigs in her quest to represent Iowa in the Senate.

If “insider-ness” in Washington were scored like archery, Liebovich would easily fall into one of the red rings if not the yellows despite carving out a public relations image (“This Town”) as a political industry critic.

Should the spade in this picture, which accompanied the article, be replaced with a pitchfork and should large numbers of them arrive in Washington in the hands of angered citizens, Liebovich would be high on the list of targets.

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Apropos of pigs, even a blind pig finds an acorn now and again and here is the acorn so artfully missed in this article.

Industry sources differ but only by degree. Political communication is aimed very low on the educational scale. Some say seventh-grade, which means fifth-grade for older readers, but others raise their eyebrows and suggest that it might be as high as ninth-grade.

Leibovich is also critical of Iowa independent Senate candidate, Bob Quast, for an ad warning potential home intruders that he would “use my Glock to blow your balls off.”

No doubt, this article will have a profound effect on house races in Brooklyn and Cambridge though probably nowhere else. More importantly, it will enhance Leibovich’s image in the all-important Prius, quinoa and kale demographic.

Since he opened the door with the Glock and balls thing, here is the theme for anyone running for office against Mark Liebovich: “what an asshole.”

Now there is a word that is easily understood in Brooklyn.

 

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Haven Pell

At the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, a woman asked Benjamin Franklin, “Well, Doctor, what have we got, a republic or a monarchy?” Without hesitation, Franklin replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.”

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